Category Archives: Theater

The Basset Table

Dates: Apr 6-22, 2018 (Thu-Sat at 7:30 p.m. & Sun at 2:00 p.m.) Apr 5 invited preview
Tickets: $22 ($20 for students/seniors/Fringe button; $18 for groups of 10 or more)
Ages: Recommended for Ages 13+
Duration: 90-120 minutes, including intermission.

Persistent Theatre Productions presents
The Basset Table
Written by Susanna Centlivre, and Edited by Jane Milling

“Strong women know how to play their cards.”

The gambling widow Lady Reveller and female scientist Valeria are not your typical 18th century women, these independent strong women must fight to keep doing what they love, in this progressive ahead of it’s time restoration comedy, by one of the most prominent female playwrights of her time.

Directed by Meggie Greivell
Stage Management by Sarah Wolf
Set and Props Design by Beth Anne Roe
Costume Design by Rebecca Karstad

​Featuring: Julie Ann Greif, Lana Bean, Alison Anderson, Bruce Abas, Kjer Whiting, Jody Bee, Tara Lucchino, Franklin Wagner, Don Larsson, Allison True, Amanda Thomm and Maureen Bourgeois.

Dirk (and others still with us)

Dates: Fri-Sat, Mar 23-24, 2018 at 7:30 p.m. (matinee added for Sat @ 3:00 p.m.)
Tickets: Free admission. Email boxoffice@macalester.edu
Ages: Recommended for Ages 13+
Duration: 60-75 minutes. No intermission.

Macalester College Theater and Dance Department presents
Dirk (and others still with us)
An original work, created by Director Anna Brujin and the cast

Dirk is a devised work based on Anna Brujin’s grandfather. It is her senior capstone in the Theater and Dance Department.

Hand in Hand

Date: Thu, Dec 14 at 7:30 pm
Tickets: Pay What You Can $5-$15
Ages: Ages 9+
Duration: 60 minutes, followed by discussion.

Hand in Hand
written and performed by Leslye Orr

First performed in 1982, Hand in Hand is a play in which audience members experience a heightened awareness of their own senses. They are seated in a spiral configuration, asked to close their eyes, and brought in touch with the world of Helen Keller, who was deaf and blind, and her teacher, Anne Sullivan, who was legally blind. A myriad of objects are passed around the spiral while actress Leslye Orr tells a riveting story inspired by the profound letters and witty lectures of the great educator and her spirited pupil. Orr, herself legally blind since birth, created Hand in Hand to share her belief in the “possibilities of disabilities.” Watch video

This workshop-performance has been presented for schools, colleges, at staff trainings for organizations such as Serve Minnesota (Americorps) and for human resources departments at places like the Walker Art Center and Carlson School of Management. In 2012, Leslye traveled to Lithuania, Latvia and Israel with Hand in Hand as a speaker and specialist for the U.S. State Department.

The Liminal Being

Date: Thu-Sat, Dec 7-9 at 7:30 pm & Sun, Dec 10 at 2:00 pm
Tickets: $15
Ages: Ages 16+
Duration: 60-75 mins.

The Liminal Being
written and performed by Mai Rose

A story of a woman who finds herself living a life, in and out of time. A weaving of fantasy and reality that invites the audience to consider their own truth and inspires them to author their own existence by finding beauty in the tragic and mundane.

The Pursuit of Awesome

Dates: Fri-Sat, Nov 17-18, 2017 at 7:30 p.m.
Tickets: Adults $15, Fringe Button $12, Student $10
Ages: Recommended for Ages 10+
Duration: 60 minutes. No intermission.

David Harris shares embarrassing stories, failures and advice in his pursuit of awesome. Featuring snow-shovel acrobatics, escapes, balances, stunts, upside-down juggling, dancing and other awesome antics.

David Harris performs new and unusual stories, stunts, and physical comedy. Why? Because it will be awesome! David always wanted to be awesome. In 1983, he tried to ride his Huffy bicycle up a tree. Had he made it to the top; it would have been awesome. In 1985, he took jazz dancing lessons at Colleen’s School of Dance. Why? Because he thought he signed up for Break Dancing lessons and that would have been awesome! In 2014, he learned how to balance a knife on his tongue. Why, because the path toward awesome is easily confused with the path toward being reckless and weird.

Through juggling stunts, snow-shovel acrobatics, and comic dancing, David shares his embarrassments, failures, and advice in the pursuit of awesome.